spaces and mental health

スペースとメンタルヘルス

Alexandra Levasseur

Right after high school graduation in Italy, I spent my gap year and an half in Australia. I hopped from share houses, to farms, to hostels, to villas overlooking the Pacific Ocean. I packed and unpacked my turquoise luggage more than 10 times. It was hard; it was rewarding; it was challenging; it was strengthening. It was a whole lot of highs and lows. I worked a lot and I learned independence - which was what I wanted and, for that, I am so proud of myself. My gap year wasn’t exactly a ‘working holiday’ or ‘backpacking’ experience, and I definitely felt settled a couple times. Even then, my mental health became poor.

イタリアで高校を卒業してすぐに、私はオーストラリアで1年半過ごすことにした。シェアハウスにステイしたり、ファームにステイしたり、ホステルにステイしたり、太平洋が見渡せる別荘にステイしたり。私はターコイズカラーのスーツケースをパッキングして、アンパッキングしてを10回以上も繰り返した。大変だったけど、やりがいがあったし、挑戦的だったけど、私を強くしてくれた。気分がいいときもあれば、どん底のときもあった。いっぱい働いたし、自立することも学んだ。それは私がやりたかったことだったし、自分のことを誇りに思う。私のオーストラリアで過ごした1年半は『ワーキングホリデー』でも『バックパッカー』でもなかったけど、何度か一つの場所に落ち着くことがあった。それから私の精神状態は悪くなっていった。

I recently came across a Dazed and Confused article which resonated with me a lot. The article discusses how the new generations spend so much time in their bedroom, doing everything in their beds – which includes eating, working, chilling and entertaining themselves, and how this often depends on the conditions which these young people are forced living into.

最近、Dazed and Confusedの記事を読んで、ものすごく共感したの。(記事は英語のみです。)その記事では、新しい世代の若者は多くの時間をベッドルームで過ごして、食べたり、仕事をしたり、のんびりしたり、楽しむときですら、何をするにもベッドの上で過ごしてる。そしてこれがだんだんと若者の生き方の条件として強制されてくるということ。