bitter valentine's

甘くないバレンタイン

こんにちは。ひかりです。前回、honeyhandsで勉強に関して書きましたが、やっと試験たちが終わり、春休みになりました。大学が休みなので最近はアルバイトをたくさんしています。皆さんはいかがお過ごしですか? 私がやっているアルバイトの一つに、日本酒バーでの仕事があります。先日、ここのバイトに入った時にお客さんたちと話した話題がとても興味深かったので、シェアしようと思いました。

Hi, it’s Hikari. Last time on honeyhands I wrote about studying; now I’m finally finished with my exams and on spring break! Since I’m not in school, I’ve been putting a lot of time into my part-time jobs. How are you guys doing? How are you spending your spring break? One of my part-time jobs is at a sake bar. I had an interesting conversation with the customers the other day that I wanted to share with you.

バレンタインデーの2日後にバイトに入ったのですが、お店での話題は専らバレンタインデーについてでした。日本ではバレンタインデーは、女性から男性にチョコレートを渡す日になっています。好きな男性やパートナーにだけ贈る人もいますが、多くは職場の男性たちにも配ったり、学生だと部活やサークルのメンバー、クラスメイトに配ったりもします。勿論、女の子同士で贈り合う人もいます。好きな人やパートナーに渡すチョコレートは「本(本命)チョコ」と呼ばれ、職場や学校などで配るチョコレートは「義理チョコ」、友達に贈るチョコレートは「友チョコ」と呼ばれています。

I started my job two days after Valentine’s Day, and that was all we talked about that day. In Japan, Valentine’s Day is a day where women gift men chocolate. There are people who only gift to a partner or someone they’re into, but most people give out chocolates to men at their workplace, or if they’re students, to members in their club or to classmates. Of course, there are also women who exchange chocolates amongst each other. Chocolates that you would gift to a partner or someone you’re into are called “hon-choco” (abbreviation for honmei chocolate which means chocolate for the one). Chocolates that you would give out in the workplace or at school are called “giri-choco” (meaning obligatory chocolate), a