citizens of the world

July 16, 2018

by

世界市民性を夢見て

みなさんこんにちは!エリーです。

Hi everybody, this is Eli.

 

みなさん、留学したことある? 

私は日本にしか留学したことないから、他の国のことはよくわからないけど、日本で留学する人って多くの場合、「留学生」という枠に入れてしまい、他国から来ていることがステータスになることがある。これは日本人と留学生が交流する場合だけではなく、留学生同士で交流するときもそう。

 

Have you ever studied abroad?

I’ve only studied abroad in Japan, so I can’t really say anything about the other countries, but when you come as a foreign student here you get labelled as an “exchange student” and your foreignness kind of becomes your label. This doesn’t only happen when talking with Japanese people, but also with other foreigners.

 

日本人と話すときも、留学生と話すときも、自分の国と日本の違い、自分の国と他の国の違いっていうのは、よくする話だ。そして来ている国によって、色んなことが期待されることもある。これはステレオタイプに少し近いことかも。例えば、イタリアから来ている私は冷凍食品で育てられたのにも関わらず、たいして知らないイタリアの食文化についてよく聞かれたりする。(笑)

 

Both when talking with Japanese people and fellow exchange students, you often end up talking about the differences between your country and their/other countries. Often the people you talk with will have certain expectations of you because you come from a certain country – to me this is kinda close to stereotypes. For example, since I come to Italy people come talk to me about Italian food – even though I don’t know much about it since I was raised on frozen food.

 

私たちの認識の中で、「国籍」っていうカテゴリーがはっきり存在すると思う。私たちの多くは自分の国で生まれ、自分の国で教育を受け、自分の国の制度の中で毎日生きている。この「国」という空間で似たような道を歩んできた人々と時間を過ごし、交流している中で「自国の文化」という認識が、私たちの中に沸くことが多いかも。

 

To me this happens because we understand the world through the category of “nationality”. We are born in our country, are educated in our country, and live our everyday life amidst the institutions of our country. We spend time with people that have followed a similar path in this same place we call “country”, and through these interactions we develop a sense of belonging to a certain culture.

 

「自国の文化」が存在し続けるために、「他国の文化」とはっきりした存在がなければならない。例えば、着物に似たような服装がフィンランドにあったと想像してみよう。「着物」は日本固有の、特徴的な文化じゃなくなるかもしれない。こうして、私たちは「自国固有」のものや特徴を探して、「自国の文化」を作り、それをアイデンティティーの基盤にしていく。イタリア人はピザのおいしさを自慢する。日本人は四季の美しさを語る。

 

In order for “our (country’s) culture” to continue existing, we need to compare it to a precisely defined “other (country’s) culture”. Let’s try imagining that clothes similar to kimono existed in Finland as well. The “kimono” would not be recognized as a peculiar symbol of Japanese culture. We look for something that can be characteristic of “our country” and create “our culture”, and we use it as a base for our identity. Italians speak of how delicious pizza is, and Japanese people talk of the beauty of the four seasons.

 

私たちはみんなそれぞれ違うし、それぞれ違う文化の持ち主だという考え方は、いい面がたくさんあると思う。とても大きい規模で考えてみると、違いは世界を豊かにする。地球に住んでいる人間がみんな同じように生活しなければならいことは、誰も望んでないと思う。

 

しかし、「国」っていう単位も、かなり大きい単位として捉えられるかもしれない。マイノリティーのことを考えてみると、わかりやすくなる思う。一つの国のなかで、「一般の国民」と違う人は、必ずいて、「自国の文化」を主張しすぎたら、彼ら彼女らを排除してしまうことになるかも。ピザが嫌いなイタリア人はきっと、たくさんいるはず。(笑)

 

Each one of us is different from the others, and it’s generally a good thing to think that we all carry within ourselves a different culture. Especially if you think on a really big scale, difference makes the world more rich. I think nobody wants all the people who live on earth to share a single, unified culture!

 

However, “nations” could be taken as being a pretty big yardstick as well. This is easy to understand if you think of a country from the perspective of the minority groups who live in it. In every country you have some groups that are in some way different from “the imagined citizen”, and putting too much of an emphasis on one’s national culture is bound to exclude these people. I’m sure there are a lot of Italians who, like me, don’t really like pizza lol

 

 

「国」っていう単位を超える理由がもう一つある。それは一言でいうと、グローバル化だ。私たち人間は、地球上で前よりもつながっている。私はイタリアに住みながら、日本で作られているアニメを毎朝テレビで見て育った。小学中学性の時、イギリスの作家が書いた「ハリー・ポッター」に夢中だった。大学生の時に外食する時は、友達とアラブ系の料理を食べていた。おそらくこのようなことが言えるのは、私だけじゃない。(笑)

 

There is another reason to go beyond the category of “nation” – globalization. We’re now connected more than we ever were. I grew up watching Japanese cartoons on television every morning and reading the English fantasy novel “Harry Potter”. When I went out with my friends in my university days, we used to eat Middle Eastern food a lot.

 

もちろんグローバル化はいいものばかりではない。この時代の問題も世界規模の物がたくさんある。例えば、地球温暖化は一つの国だけでは絶対に解決できない。温暖化は地球に影響を与えるからとても当たり前なことなのかもしれないが、ジェンダーや人種差別のような、思想・社会にかかわる問題も、グローバルな規模で解決しようとしている人々がたくさんいる。例えば、世界中の貧困層は女性の方が多いっていうことは、一つの国のフェミニストたちが解決できることではない。

 

Globalization doesn’t always come with good things. Some of the biggest problems we’re facing right now are global – one easily recognizable example is global warming. Even when dealing with questions that don’t physically affect the planet we’re living in, it is increasingly common to try and find answers that go beyond a specific nation. For example, female poverty is widely regarded as a global phenomenon, and women are considered to be at a bigger risk of financial hardship than average in almost every country. This is a problem that can hardly be solved if we keep looking at the world as made up of many separated nations.

 

 

世界を国別に分けて、国の文化を作ることは、マジョリティーじゃない人を排除する理由にもなるし、色んな問題を解決するのに不十分になってきている。しかし「自国の文化」を全く否定して、18世紀の哲学者たちが想像していた世界規模の同化した世界共通文化も、支配的だと思う。いったいどうすればいいの?

 

Dividing the world in nations and creating national cultures leads to the systematic discrimination of minorities, and it’s not sufficient to solve some very pressing matters. However, completely abandoning “our (country’s) culture” and striving for the universal culture that the Illuminists dreamed of is also a form of domination. What are we supposed to do then?

 

人々が個人であり、国民であり、そして世界に生きている人であると思えば、何か変わるんじゃないかと思う。自国の文化に影響されながらも、国境の外から来ているものに影響され、自分だけの思考を日々作っていく生き物だ。私たちは生きていく中で、個人や、自国や、SNSなどのトランスナショナルなメディアで日々発信される、国の枠を超えた文化の好きなところや、嫌いなところを選んでいるし、それぞれはパズルピースのように、「私たち」という人間を形成していくと思う。私は、こんな世界市民性を夢見ている。

 

Maybe something would change if we started considering people as being at the same time individuals, citizens of a nation and people who live in this world. We humans are complex beings and these three characteristics intersect inside ourselves in many different ways. We use different notions originating from our immediate surroundings, from our “national” culture and from the “global culture” that is increasingly emerging through social media in many different ways, combining them as building blocks that eventually form who we are – unique but in some way similar, interconnected citizens of the world.

 

Images by Eli

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Follow us on Instagram!