living with languages

June 13, 2019

by

多言語で生きること

 

 

“You’re never going to reach the same level of fluency that you have in your first language, you know…”

 

「母語のように第三言語を話せるようになれないのでね…」

 

I was drinking coffee in the kitchenette and talking with a classmate. I was talking in my third language; she was talking in what I assume to be her second.

 

私は大学の給湯室で後輩と日本語で話していました。日本語は私の第三言語で、彼女の第二言語だと思う。

 

“Yeah…”

 

「そうですね…」と、私は返した。

 

That's all I felt like replying.

 

それしか答えられなかった。

 

Some people like to say these things -- they like to think that the power that the “mother tongue” has on their mind is absolute.

 

こういう風に母語の圧倒的な力を信じる人は、結構多いの。

 

I honestly am not so convinced.

 

私は正直にいうと、納得できない。

 

 

I can speak three languages, and I consider my abilities in all three of them to be imperfect. My first language, Italian, is mostly okay, but when I was writing papers for school they were full of red marks pointing out the anglicisms. They were a lot, and they came out in the most unexpected situations. Italian and English have a lot of similar words, and since I have been reading a lot in both languages since I was small, I get confused.

 

 

私は3つの言語を話すことができるけど、3つともが不完全だと思う。いわゆる「母語」のイタリア語はまあ、もちろん話せるけど、たまに言葉を忘れてしまったり、イタリア語にない英語っぽい表現を使ったりしてしまう。これは昔からそうなの。学校の作文では英語っぽい言葉がいつも赤ペンで訂正されていた。イタリア語と英語は、似ている言葉がたくさんあって、子供の時から両言語で読み書きしていた私は、未だに混乱してしまう。

 

My second language, English, is also mostly ok, but I definitely have an Italian accent. What stands out are the Italianized (sometimes even Japanized) expressions. The imperfections in my second language are the ones that bother me the least, mainly because I've never even been to an English speaking country. Although I have friends who are native speakers, we're all living abroad, and they're open-minded enough not to care.

 

第二言語の英語も、まあまあ大丈夫だと思う。だけど間違いなく発音がイタリア人っぽい。たまにイタリア語か日本語から直訳した表現を使ってしまう。まだ英語圏の国に行ったことがないから、英語が不完全だということは実はそこまで気にならない。そしてネイティブスピーカーの友達はみんな海外で出会った人たちだし、優しい人ばかりなので、たまに変わった表現を使ってもみんな許してくれるの。

 

My third language, Japanese, is the weakest, but it would be a lie to say that I'm not fluent. It is also the most painful to speak, because it is perceived as a deeply national idiom. Many people, both in Japan and abroad, associate the Japanese language to Japan as a country, as well as to Japanese culture. And although this might happen pretty much everywhere, Japan has for a long time tried to maintain a myth of homogeneity, along with very strict immigration policies. Perhaps because of this, it then becomes very easy to think that only Japanese people (or those of Japanese descent) can be fluent. Me, a foreigner speaking this language at this high level is just weird.

 

私の第三言語は日本語なの。おそらく話している言語の中で一番弱いけど、それでも流暢といえば流暢なのかもしれない。私が喋る言語の中で、日本語は間違いなく一番話しづらい。日本語はたしかに難しいけど、喋りたがらないのは日本語が難しいからじゃないの。日本でも海外でも、「日本語」は「日本人」がしゃべる言語と思われているの。「単一民族神話*」が普及していた国だし、建前では移民政策も存在していない日本だから、正確な「日本語」が「日本人」(又は日本人の血が入っている人)しか話せないという考え方に陥るのがとても簡単だと思う。それで私みたいに、日本と血のつながりもなく、日本で育ったわけではない人が日本語をペラペラ話せるのが、ただただ変だと思われてしまうこともある。

 

*単一民族神話=日本には昔から日本人しか住んでいないという、エスニックマイノリティに排他的な歴史的価値観

 

 

 

Sometimes, if it's a very short interaction, people can't tell my nationality from my voice. But you can see the shock in their eyes when they see my face and realise that I’m not Japanese. I have very mixed feelings towards this kind of emotional responses. Part of me tries to justify them, and I tell myself that perhaps it can’t be helped since I’m part of a linguistic minority. But at the same time, it’s sad to see that many can’t even picture the possibility of a non-Japanese looking person speaking the language.

 

会話が短かったら、相手が私は日本人じゃないことに気づかないこともある。そういうときはだいたい、目が合った時に私が外国人だということに気づいて、相手がびっくりしてしまう。こういう風にびっくりされたら、私もいろいろモヤモヤしちゃうんだよね。仕方がないかなと流したいときもあるけど、それと同時に日本語が流暢な外国人を想像できない人がこんなにいることが、少し寂しいの。

 

Anyways, my understanding of the three languages is not really separate. They're not isolated from each other in their own separate boxes, so to say. Nor is it heavily dependent on each other, like a chain reaction in which my understanding of the second language depends on the first and my understanding of the third depends on the second. Maybe it used to, but not anymore. Maybe at some point in my learning process, I was thinking back to the other languages I know, but I honestly don’t remember. My understanding and command of my second language are independent enough that I understand difficult concepts better in English rather than in the language I grew up in! But how do I even try to explain that Italian is not necessarily my strongest language when the attachment to the “mother tongue” idea is so strong?

 

本題に戻ると、私の頭の中でそれぞれの言語が別れているわけではないし、それぞれの個別の押入れに入っているみたいな感じでもない。そして、第三言語と第二言語が、母語に依存しているわけでもない。もしかしたら昔はそうだったかもしれないけど、正直にいうとあまり覚えてない。特に英語の場合は、論文や専門的な文章を英語で読んだほうが楽というぐらい、母語から自立している。場合によってイタリア語は一番うまくしゃべる言語ではないけど…「母語」の力を信じている人にこういう話をしても、あまり理解してもらえない。

 

I would like to think I have the same independence in my third language as well. I have not reached it quite yet, although I am working on it. But this time it is going to be significantly harder. As I said before, Japanese is protected by tall, tall barriers that are mostly social in nature. It is easy to lose the motivation to keep learning when you often hear things like the comment that my acquaintance said.

 

日本語もそれぐらい自立していると思いたいけど、まだまだできないことがたくさんある。これから日本語ももっとうまくなりたいし、頑張っているけど、話す度にびっくりされると、モチベーションを失ってしまう時もある。

 

 

The potential consequences of these words are not limited to the destruction of my self-confidence. This kind of routine thinking also affects the society we live in, and I am especially sensitive to these effects because these ideas are particularly pervasive in Japan, where I am currently living. This ideology of the primacy of the mother tongue is so widespread that if you’re Japanese, speaking another language fluently is seen as if it is some sort of superpower. At the same time, if you’re a foreigner (and this is particularly true for White/Black foreigners) it is pretty much assumed that you are never going to be fluent.

 

こういう考え方は、言語を勉強している人の自信を失わせるだけではなく、社会にも影響を与えていると思います。私が経験した社会の中で日本は特に、日本語の影響力は圧倒的すぎて、違う言語が話せることだけでスーパーパワーを持っているかのように思われてるような気もする… 逆に、外国人の人はめったにしか流暢になれないと思う人はたくさんいるかもしれない。

 

Culture and language, however, get mixed up very easily. These imagined linguistic barriers often become cultural barriers, that in turn become barriers between people. It is assumed that people who are culturally distant to you are people who you can’t relate to, which makes it harder to spontaneously become friends with people who see you as culturally different.

 

日本でも海外でもそうなんですが、実は「言語」と「文化」を混ざって考える人は、結構多い気がする。だからこそ、決まった人しか決まった言語を話せることができないという考え方が、特定の人しか特定の文化を習得することができないという考え方になりがちなの。さらに、文化が遠ければ遠いほど、親近感がわかなかったり、仲良くなるのは難しくなると思う人も、意外と多いかもしれない。こういう風に「言語」と「文化」は、厚くて高い壁になってしまうと思うの。

 

At the same time, we live in a day and age in which even the most isolated societies are becoming more connected, and this means that more and more “foreigners” are coming in. There is an increased need for multicultural understanding, and yet how can we have an understanding of others that is not superficial if linguistic barriers are seen as so rigid?

 

しかしそれと同時に、私たちは異文化理解が日常生活のための大事なスキルになりつつある時代に生きているの。もともと隔離されていた社会でも、今は世界と繋がっているし、どこの社会にでも人の移動が起きている。異なる文化・言語の間にこんなに分厚い壁があると思われているのなら、これから増えていく「外国人」を理解し、受け入れることが果たして可能なのかな?

 

 

 

To me, thinking of languages as separate entities inside your brain -- as if they were archived under different folders -- doesn’t really make sense. This might be because I could not imagine living a life that doesn’t require using all of them together. I mostly use Japanese when I'm at home, but there are times when me and my boyfriend speak English, too. Lately, I’ve been trying to teach him Italian as well. The same goes for school; I mostly speak to my professors in Japanese, but with my peers I speak both Japanese and English. I read theory in English, empirical research in Japanese. I write and present in all three. These languages aren’t accessories -- they are the very tissue of which my everyday life is made.

 

私にとっては、言語を個別の存在として考えることが、あまり意味のないことなのかも。実際、私は知っている三つの言語を日常的に使っているし、どれかを使わない人生が想像できない。家にいるときは主に日本語だけど、日本人の彼氏と英語でしゃべる時もある。最近はイタリア語も教えてるの。学校でも同じで、先生とは日本語で話しているけど、友達とは英語を使うことが多い。理論の本は英語で読むけど、ケーススタディは日本語が多い。そして研究は、イタリア語・英語・日本語という三つの言語で書いたり、発表したりする。私にとってこの三つの言語はアクセサリーではない。私の日常を作り上げている積み木のようなものだ。

 

But perhaps because of this, I will never achieve mastery in any of them, mother tongue included. This is not necessarily something negative though! By learning and living with other languages, I’ve come to realize the high price that perfection has. One, it doesn’t leave you any time to move on to the next thing. Two, it might prompt you to protect those language barriers I mentioned before - you might become so dedicated to the “standard” that it makes it hard to accept any deviation from it. Three, it can make you judge more harshly those who don’t speak languages perfectly.

 

しかし三つともを同時に使っているからこそ、全部をマスターすることはできないかも。これも悪いことじゃないんだけどね!多言語で生活することで学んだのは、言語習得の完璧主義者であることは、必ずしもいいことではないことなの。完璧に話せるようになりたいと思ったら、新しい言語は学べないし、言語を正確に話せることが大事になってくるから、前に話していた「言語の壁」を守りたくなるかも。そして完璧主義者であるほど、完璧に話せない人を見下してしまうかも。

 

This is why, with time, I've come to appreciate language forms that are non-standard, like Spanglish, or dialects. Merging languages is a radical act, and a much needed one at that.

 

それで最近思うのは、言語はもっと自由に話してもいい!ってこと。スパングリッシュのような、スペイン語と英語を混ざっている言語も面白いと思う。日本社会も海外の色んな社会も、こういった言語の混交や方言などを、もっと受け入れてくれる社会になったらいいなと思う。

 

Have you ever felt in a similar way about languages? I’d be curious to know what you all think!

 

皆さんも言語でモヤモヤしたり、悩んだりする経験はある?ぜひコメントでもシェアしてください!

 

Main Image by Yumi

Images by Eli

Edited by Hikari and Kiara

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Follow us on Instagram!